Tuesday, March 30, 2010

A Must See: Food Inc.


If you haven't seen the movie Food Inc. yet, do yourself a favor and rent it. It's a pretty amazing movie about the state of the food industry and for that matter the health of America. It's pretty amazing how fast food and the corn industry have transformed the way we eat and for that matter the options we have as consumers.

A few facts that stood out, 50 years ago we spent 9% on healthcare and I believe 26% on food. ( I can't recall the exact numbers off hand, but I think thats close) Today those numbers are exactly reversed! Coincidence?

You vote 3x a day with what you eat and how you spend your dollar.

How is it I can buy a hamburger for a dollar but not an organic apple? Subsidies and consumer demand.

We all know that wild salmon are considered a super food because of all the Omega 3 fatty acids. Grass fed beef has just as much.

To see change to the food system that has been given to us, vote with your money, support your local farmers market, support business's that practice good food habits. Did you know Chipolte uses only naturally raised chicken and pork, no chicken houses or antibiotics.

Watch the movie.

2 comments:

Dr. Scott said...

Whats weird is i think Chipotle was initially 87% owned by McDonalds'. A few websites to look at for you. We use doortodoororganics.com check out http://michigan.doortodoororganics.com/ they deliver to your door for a very reasonable cost. Also check out http://www.eatwild.com/ and find out local farms in your area where you can get quality grass fed meats and organics.

Ben said...

A good film for sure; I still have enjoyed the books by Schlosser and Pollan much better, but the visual aids were pretty striking. I'm still amazed by the subsidies; they make little sense to me on the level of global impact. The US, as of last year is apparently committed to downsizing these, but haven't seen much of it yet come to fruition. Starting to have some local farms here offer "buy-ins"; you pay $400 for 12 weeks of fresh fruits/vegetables grown in your town or county. Interesting, a few of the faculty here are jumping in on it.